When the construction site he worked at was forced to close due to COVID-19 restrictions in September, construction worker U Aung Khant had to take out loans to feed his family. (Hkun Lat | Frontier)
Since health authorities introduced stay-at-home orders for Yangon in September, informal workers and small business owners have faced a grim struggle to make ends meet amid a lack of government assistance.
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Since health authorities introduced stay-at-home orders for Yangon in September, informal workers and small business owners have faced a grim struggle to make ends meet amid a lack of government assistance.
When Vicky Bowman became director of the Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business in October 2013 she was hardly a stranger to the country. The former diplomat had served at the British embassy as a second secretary from 1990 to 1993 and as ambassador from 2002 to 2006. After working as director of global and economic issues at the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office from 2008 to 2011, Ms Bowman joined the Anglo-Australian metals and mining giant Rio Tinto, where she was responsible for implementing the company’s commitment to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Fluent in Myanmar, she is married to well-known Myanmar artist Htein Lin. Ms Bowman spoke to Frontier’s Peter Janssen.

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Stories in this issue
What Kyaw Myint’s downfall tells us about doing business in Myanmar
Kyaw Myint is just the tiniest tip of a very large iceberg of criminal activity in Myanmar’s business community, but as long as you steer clear of politics you’re unlikely to get caught.
Myths, militias and the destruction of Loi Sam Sip
Activists in northern Shan State have been fighting for years to protect a culturally and environmentally important mountain range but face opposition from Tatmadaw-aligned militias – and a company linked to the speaker of Myanmar’s national parliament.