Seven years after Buddhist mobs burned down mosques and slaughtered dozens of children at an Islamic school, hundreds of Muslims remain displaced and they say the NLD government has done little to help heal or rebuild since.
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Seven years after Buddhist mobs burned down mosques and slaughtered dozens of children at an Islamic school, hundreds of Muslims remain displaced and they say the NLD government has done little to help heal or rebuild since.
Delphos International, a Washington DC-based company focused on project financing in emerging markets, recently completed the first phase of a study on Myanmar’s energy sector under a project financed by the United States Trade and Development Agency (USTDA). At the request of the Ministry of Electricity and Energy, the study was expanded to include the state of the national electricity grid and its capacity to handle power from renewable sources. The manager of the project, Mr Eric Shumway, spoke to Frontier’s Thomas Kean about why the ministry has concerns about renewables, comparing the cost of different power generation types and why power shortages could get much worse before the situation begins to improve. Before joining Delphos to manage the project, Shumway was a director at London Economics International, an energy economics consultancy.

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Stories in this issue
What Kyaw Myint’s downfall tells us about doing business in Myanmar
Kyaw Myint is just the tiniest tip of a very large iceberg of criminal activity in Myanmar’s business community, but as long as you steer clear of politics you’re unlikely to get caught.
Myths, militias and the destruction of Loi Sam Sip
Activists in northern Shan State have been fighting for years to protect a culturally and environmentally important mountain range but face opposition from Tatmadaw-aligned militias – and a company linked to the speaker of Myanmar’s national parliament.