The regime's sudden decision has hobbled Myanmar citizens seeking better lives overseas and risks depriving migrant workers of legal protections, with rights groups suspecting a ploy to target dissidents.
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The regime's sudden decision has hobbled Myanmar citizens seeking better lives overseas and risks depriving migrant workers of legal protections, with rights groups suspecting a ploy to target dissidents.
Some anti-coup armed groups have chosen to remain independent of the National Unity Government, with varying degrees of success. Citing distrust of the NUG and disappointment with the NLD, these groups are going it alone or relying on the support of ethnic armed groups.
Rule of law has collapsed since last year’s coup, giving rise to rampant military rights abuses and vigilante justice. Emerging parallel legal structures in resistance strongholds are giving some hope that a fairer Myanmar is on the horizon.

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The early delivery of vaccines is one of the many boons of the country’s geopolitics, but to really take advantage, Myanmar must bury the legacy of its isolationist past.
Will the Kayin BGF go quietly?
The Kayin State Border Guard Force has come under intense pressure from the Tatmadaw over its extensive, controversial business interests and there’s concern the ultimatum could trigger fresh hostilities in one of the country’s most war-torn areas.