A boycott launched in the wake of the February 1 coup has caused sales of Myanmar Beer to plummet – and may even have wiped US$1 billion off the value of its military-linked parent company.
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A boycott launched in the wake of the February 1 coup has caused sales of Myanmar Beer to plummet – and may even have wiped US$1 billion off the value of its military-linked parent company.
In July 2014, the Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business named Yangon-based Parami Energy as the most responsible and transparent company in the country’s energy sector. Two weeks ago, the World Economic Forum added another accolade: Parami was invited to join its exclusive Community of Global Growth Companies. Eligible companies have a turnover of at least US$100 million and are committed to having a positive effect on the economies and societies in which they operate. Frontier spoke with Parami CEO Ken Tun about his vision for natural resources development in Myanmar and the country’s future as a supplier of energy to Southeast Asia.

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The early delivery of vaccines is one of the many boons of the country’s geopolitics, but to really take advantage, Myanmar must bury the legacy of its isolationist past.
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The Kayin State Border Guard Force has come under intense pressure from the Tatmadaw over its extensive, controversial business interests and there’s concern the ultimatum could trigger fresh hostilities in one of the country’s most war-torn areas.